Trust the Torch!

COVID-19

Children under age of 5 eligible for COVID-19 vaccine

Staff Report news@thewoodstockindependent.com Everyone 6 months of age or older is eligible to receive a vaccination to protect against COVID-19, the McHenry County Department of Health is announced Thursday. The […]

Subscribe or Login to continue reading this quality article by The Woodstock Independant

Start a free trial, then pay only $5 per month after

Appellate court declines to block enforcement of vaccine, testing mandate

By PETER HANCOCKCapitol News Illinoisphancock@capitolnewsillinois.com SPRINGFIELD –A state appellate court ruled this week that it will not block enforcement of the Pritzker administration’s mandate that certain categories of public employees either be vaccinated against COVID-19 or undergo regular testing.The 2-1 ruling by the 4th District Court of Appeals upheld a Sangamon County judge’s decision on April 1 not to issue a temporary restraining order blocking enforcement of the policy.The decision involved three consolidated cases in which public employees are seeking to overturn the mandate. The cases include suits against Gov. J.B. Pritzker, various state agencies, the Pekin Fire Department, and the Deland-Weldon school district.Pritzker first issued a vaccine mandate on Aug. 26, 2021, through an executive order that applied to health care workers, school employees, higher education personnel and students, and state employees who work in congregate facilities. The order also authorized other entities, both public and private, to enact their own vaccination and testing requirements.The employees sued to block enforcement of the order, citing the state’s Health Care Right of Conscience Act, which, among other things, makes it illegal to discriminate against people for refusing to receive any particular form of health care that they find contrary to their conscience.That law was originally enacted to shield health care workers from liability for refusing to perform or assist in abortions. During last year’s fall veto session, however, lawmakers passed an amendment to that law making a specific exception for health care measures that are intended to prevent the spread of COVID-19.That provision does not officially go into effect until June 1. But lawmakers inserted language in the measure stating the section “is a declaration of existing law” rather than a new enactment.In other words, the General Assembly said it was only clarifying something that was ambiguous in an existing law, which in this case involved the word “discriminate.”The Sangamon County Circuit Court cited that law in denying the plaintiffs’ request for a temporary restraining order, saying that even though it hasn’t taken effect yet, it can still be used as an aid in understanding the original statute.But the plaintiffs appealed, noting that the new law has not yet gone into effect while also arguing that even though the amendment claims to be a declaration of existing law, the Legislature cannot retroactively change the meaning of an otherwise unambiguous statute.In their appeal, the plaintiffs cited a 2020 decision from the 2nd District Court of Appeals involving the same statute that said there was nothing ambiguous about the word “discriminate.”“To the contrary, the ordinary meaning of the word is set forth in its dictionary definition,” the 2nd District court wrote.That case involved a nurse in a public health clinic who claimed religious objections to providing family planning services or referring patients for abortions.In its ruling Wednesday, however, the 4th District appellate court said that simply because a word has a dictionary definition does not make its meaning within a statute unambiguous. In this case, the court said, it would be discriminatory only if an employer punished workers who refused to be vaccinated or tested as a matter of conscience but did not punish those who refused for other reasons.The vaccine and testing requirements, the court wrote, could actually be seen as merit-based policies because those who are vaccinated or tested are less likely to spread COVID-19 in the workplace.The plaintiffs also challenged the vaccine and testing mandates under the Illinois Department of Public Health Act, which gives that agency “supreme authority in matters of quarantine and isolation.”But the appellate court rejected that argument as well, saying that the employers in the three cases had not quarantined or isolated anyone, but had instead only threatened loss of employment.“To be fired is not to be quarantined or isolated from the community at large,” the majority wrote.The opinion was written by Justice Peter Cavanagh, with Justice James Knecht concurring.Justice Robert Steigmann wrote a dissenting opinion. He argued that the word “discriminate” has a clear and understandable meaning and that the Legislature included in the statute numerous examples of the kinds of discrimination that are prohibited.He also argued that the 2021 amendment to the Health Care Right of Conscious Act could be used as an “interpretive aid” in understanding the original statute because he found nothing unambiguous about the original law. Capitol News Illinois is a nonprofit, nonpartisan news service covering state government and distributed to more than 400 newspapers statewide. It is funded primarily by the Illinois Press Foundation and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation.

Subscribe or Login to continue reading this quality article by The Woodstock Independant

Start a free trial, then pay only $5 per month after

Paid COVID-19 leave for vaccinated educators signed into law

By PETER HANCOCKCapitol News Illinoisphancock@capitolnewsillinois.com SPRINGFIELD – Public school, community college and public university employees who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 are now entitled to paid administrative leave for any […]

Subscribe or Login to continue reading this quality article by The Woodstock Independant

Start a free trial, then pay only $5 per month after

House passes paid leave for vaccinated teachers: Republicans call bill a vaccine mandate

By PETER HANCOCKCapitol News Illinoisphancock@capitolnewsillinois.com SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois House passed a bill Tuesday that would give teachers, professors, and other educational employees paid leave if they miss work for COVID-19-related issues, but only if they’ve been fully vaccinated. The House voted 70-28, with only Democrats voting in favor, to advance House Bill 1167, which would make the benefit retroactive to the start of the 2021-22 academic year. The bill is similar to one that lawmakers passed with broad bipartisan support during last year’s fall veto session, but which Gov. J.B. Pritzker vetoed in January because it did not include a vaccine requirement. “Well over 90 percent of teachers and staff would see a great, positive impact from this bill, and I know they would all appreciate your support to pass this bill,” Rep. Janet Yang Rohr, D-Naperville, said during floor debate on the proposal. But the vaccine requirement turned the new bill into a harshly partisan issue, with Republicans calling it an unfair “vaccine mandate.” “This does nothing to stop the spread of COVID in schools,” said Rep. C.D. Davidsmeyer, R-Jacksonville, who noted that he contracted the virus despite being fully vaccinated and that he caught it from someone else who also was fully vaccinated. “So, the idea that vaccine is stopping the spread of COVID in schools is absolutely nonsense. The reality is this is a mandate.” The bill would apply to vaccinated K-12 and higher education employees who take time off because they or a family member contracts COVID-19. It would also apply to employees who miss work because the school where they work is forced to close because of a COVID-19 outbreak, unless those days are later rescheduled. Rep. Katie Stuart, D-Edwardsville, argued that Illinois is already suffering from a shortage of teachers and that passage of the bill would send a message that the state values the work they do. “Legislation like this that shows the respect for the profession, and understanding the nature of the work that they do is how we are going to help fight our teacher shortage crisis,” she said. “We have to show that we respect teachers. We want teachers to be supported in their classrooms.” Republicans, however, argued that the bill unfairly discriminates in the way employee benefits are provided to educators on the basis of vaccination status because it provides a greater benefit to a vaccinated worker than an unvaccinated one even if neither contracts the virus. “If the teacher is fully vaccinated and her kid is ill, she can take the admin days,” said Rep. Mark Batinick, R-Plainfield. “But if the teacher is unvaccinated in that same situation, the kid’s ill, he or she does not get the benefit of those admin days.” The bill will head to the Senate for further consideration before it can head to Gov. JB Pritzker. Capitol News Illinois is a nonprofit, nonpartisan news service covering state government and distributed to more than 400 newspapers statewide. It is funded primarily by the Illinois Press Foundation and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation.

Subscribe or Login to continue reading this quality article by The Woodstock Independant

Start a free trial, then pay only $5 per month after

Find great local businesses in our new directory!

Newsletter

Subscribe for news & updates

Top Writers

Larry Lough

Larry Lough

Larry Lough is editor of The Independent and reports local news.

Janet Dovidio

Janet Dovidio

Janet Dovidio has been a freelance correspondent for The Independent for eight years.

Susan W. Murray

Susan W. Murray

Susan W. Murray wrote for The Independent, covering various beats, from 2005 to 2008.

Tricia Carzoli

Tricia Carzoli

Tricia Carzoli is a freelance writer and photographer that on community news.

Keep Exploring

Subscriber Access

Login

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience possible.